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AGYW Spotlight

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This section is updated monthly with resources that are under the spotlight.
Guidance for providing informed-choice counseling on sexual health for women interested in PrEP
Posted: Mar 28, 2017
Category: AGYW Spotlight

Guidance for providing informed-choice counseling on sexual health for women interested in PrEP

The purpose of this guidance is to promote informed decision making on sexual health for women who have expressed interest in using PrEP as part of their HIV risk-reduction strategy.

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Posted: Feb 22, 2017
Category: AGYW Spotlight

Adolescent South African girls aged 15-19 have an HIV prevalence rate eight times higher than boys of the same age. More than 2,000 young women aged 15-24 are estimated to be infected with HIV each week in South Africa. Unacceptably high rates of HIV infection, teenage pregnancy, sexual and gender-based violence (GBV), and unemployment all contribute to an environment where adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in South Africa are at significant risk for HIV infection. It will not be possible to reach HIV epidemic control in South Africa without reducing the high incidence of new infections among AGYW.
The South Africa government and PEPFAR convened a meeting to review Best Practices and Innovations in Reaching Adolescent Girls and Young Women on 26-27 October 2016. Presentations for the workshop were selected from submitted abstracts. Presentations and abstracts are available at the following website: https://za.usembassy.gov/our-relationship/pepfar/partner-dissemination-meetings/

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Posted: Nov 23, 2016
Category: AGYW Spotlight

How the world’s richest are reaching out to Africa’s children: From soccer to succour. The programme, Girls Achieve Power (GAP), funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is designed by the Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute (Wits RHI), and Grassroot Soccer. The two additional partners on the programme include Sonke Gender Justice and The Population Council. The programme plans to educate young girls about HIV/AIDS, sexual and reproductive health and gender norms.

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Posted: Nov 14, 2016
Category: AGYW Spotlight

The programme is about Health Workers looking at their involvement in dealing with teenage clients. It is also about examining the quality of care and services provided to adolescent and youth clients, whether they need help with family planning (FP), testing for HIV or STIs, pregnancy or post-delivery care or any other sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. It is about Health Workers exploring some of the reasons for the frequently reported poor quality of services provided to teenage clients and then identifying solutions to improve the situation and quality of care they provide. It is also about teens reflecting upon their needs within the context of rights and responsibilities, as well as identifying actions that they, too, can take.

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Posted: Nov 14, 2016
Category: AGYW Spotlight

Adolescent girls have become a key target population for empowerment, health, and development initiatives in low- and middle-income countries. Building Girls’ Protective Assets: A Collection of Tools for Program Design is intended for organizations that are committed to extending their programs to reach excluded subpopulations of girls and young women—whether they are the poorest girls in the poorest communities, the 10–14-year-old girls who are out of school and not living with either parent, or another subpopulation of young girls that is likely to miss out.
The collection contains tools and exercises to help programmers translate evidence on “what works” into girl-centered programming. The resources in this collection focus on programs that have been effective—through empowerment and the building of protective assets—in reducing girls’ risks and broadening their opportunities.
The tools and exercises in this collection will help program staff:

• assess and adjust current target groups and establish new target groups to ensure they are reaching those most in need of protective assets;
• adapt program materials to respond to the reality of girls’ lives; and
• monitor and evaluate to measure effects and adjust activities to increase impact.

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