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Learn Before You Leap: The Catalytic Power of a Learning Network
Posted: Oct 9, 2018
Category: Multipurpose Prevention Technologies

Learn Before You Leap: The Catalytic Power of a Learning Network

“Learn Before You Leap: The Catalytic Power of a Learning Network” was published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review. Written by IMPT collaborators David Ehrlichman and David Sawyer, this article profiles the IMPT as an example of how learning networks can advance progress in the health and social sectors.

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A strategic action framework for multipurpose prevention technologies combining contraceptive hormones and antiretroviral drugs to prevent pregnancy and HIV
Posted: Oct 9, 2018
Category: Multipurpose Prevention Technologies

A strategic action framework for multipurpose prevention technologies combining contraceptive hormones and antiretroviral drugs to prevent pregnancy and HIV

“A strategic action framework for multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) combining contraceptive hormones and antiretroviral drugs to prevent pregnancy and HIV” was published in the European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care. This article outlines a framework that was developed as an outcome of a series of expert meetings held between 2014 and 2016 which focused on identifying opportunities and challenges for MPTs that combine hormonal contraception (HC) with antiretroviral drugs into single products. The framework aims to present an actionable strategy, by addressing key research gaps and outlining the key areas for progress, to guide current and future HC MPT development.

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She knows best: Engaging girls in adolescent programming
Posted: Apr 20, 2018
Category: Health and rights

She knows best: Engaging girls in adolescent programming

With the support of the David & Lucile Packard Foundation, the International Rescue Committee piloted a new approach to increase access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care for adolescents in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo. The report “She knows best: Engaging girls in adolescent programming” highlights the strategy developed to address foundational facility and community-level barriers that prevent adolescents from accessing and receiving quality SRH services.

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Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Infections After Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Adolescent Females
Posted: Jul 24, 2017
Category: Sexually transmitted infections

Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Infections After Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Adolescent Females

IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among US females remain low, in part because of concerns that HPV vaccination may promote unsafe sexual activity by lowering perceived risks of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection (STI). OBJECTIVE To study whether HPV vaccination of females is associated with increases in STI rates.

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ADDING IT UP: Costs and Benefits of  Meeting the Contraceptive Needs of Adolescents
Posted: Mar 22, 2017
Category: Contraception

ADDING IT UP: Costs and Benefits of Meeting the Contraceptive Needs of Adolescents

■ Preventing unintended pregnancy is essential to improving adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health and their social and economic well-being.
■ About half of pregnancies among adolescent women aged 15–19 living in developing regions are unintended, and more than half of these end in abortion, often under unsafe conditions.
■ Of the 252 million adolescent women aged 15–19 living in developing regions in 2016, an estimated 38 million are sexually active and do not want a child in the next two years.
■ About 15 million of these adolescents use a modern contraceptive method, while 23 million have an unmet need for modern contraception and are thus at elevated risk of unintended pregnancy.
■ Improving services for current contraceptive users and expanding them to serve those with unmet need will cost an estimated $770 million annually, or $548 million more than current costs.
■ For an average cost of $21 per user annually, these improvements go well beyond providing contraceptive information and supplies. They include increased training
and supervision of health care workers, investments in upgraded facilities and supply systems, and information and communication efforts to ensure that adolescents have access to a range of methods and support in choosing a method and using it effectively.
■ Meeting the unmet need for modern contraception of women aged 15–19 would reduce unintended pregnancies among this age-group by 6.0 million annually. That would mean averting 2.1 million unplanned births, 3.2 million abortions and 5,600 maternal deaths.
■ The dramatic reduction in unintended pregnancies would spare women and their families the adverse consequences of early childbearing, reap savings in maternal and child health care, and boost young women’s education and economic prospects.

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