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Teenage pregnancy

Reports
Motherhood  in Childhood – Facing the challenge of adolescent pregnancy
Posted: Jul 22, 2016
Category: Teenage pregnancy

Motherhood in Childhood – Facing the challenge of adolescent pregnancy

Because adolescent pregnancy is the result of diverse underlying societal, economic and other forces, preventing it requires multidimensional strategies that are oriented towards girls’ empowerment and tailored to particular populations of girls, especially those who are marginalized and most vulnerable.
Many of the actions by governments and civil society that have reduced adolescent fertility were designed to achieve other objectives, such as keeping girls in school, preventing HIV infection, or ending child marriage. These actions can also build human capital, impart information or skills to empower girls to make decisions in life and uphold or protect girls’ basic human rights.

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A review of teenage pregnancy in South Africa
Posted: Jul 22, 2016
Category: Teenage pregnancy

A review of teenage pregnancy in South Africa

Approximately 30% of teenagers in South Africa report ‘ever having been pregnant’, the majority, unplanned. While this number has decreased over the past few decades, it is still unacceptably high. The figure is for all teenagers. (13-19 years old), but motherhood for an 18 or 19 year old has very different implications than for a young teenager, one aged 15, for example. Therefore this report tries, where possible, to be mindful of differing experiences of pregnancy and motherhood across the teen years.

A major concern of this report is to examine ways in which all pregnant teenagers and teenage mothers be supported to remain in school and, for those that do remain in, and return to school how can they be supported in their dual role and responsibilities as both learner and mother?

The literature, and the interviews we undertook, highlighted that the most important factor for determining whether a teenage mother would return to school was whether she had family support (in particular from her mother) to assist her with child-care responsibilities, and/or money to pay for childcare. Supporting a teenage mother with daily childcare responsibilities seems to be the most critical factor that will enable her to return to school.

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Teenage pregnancy
Posted: Jul 22, 2016
Category: Teenage pregnancy

Teenage pregnancy

The study involved a desktop review of literature supported by secondary data analysis to provide an overview of research on the prevalence, determinants and interventions for teenage pregnancy.
Although the study focused on pregnancy, the detailed trends presented in the report are on fertility. Understanding the distinction between pregnancy and fertility is essential. Fertility rates refer only to pregnancies that have resulted in live births while pregnancy rates include both live births and pregnancies that have been terminated. Before the introduction of the termination of pregnancy legislation, fertility closely approximated pregnancy rates. Since the legalisation of abortion, however, this can no longer be assumed to be the case. Trends in pregnancy rates in SA cannot be accurately estimated for two reasons. Firstly, it is not known whether pregnancies that were terminated early on are well-captured in survey data and school record systems. Secondly, a comprehensive national register of abortion is not maintained in the country.

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