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Classification of digital health interventions
Posted: Apr 30, 2018
Category: Sexual and reproductive health

Classification of digital health interventions

The classification of digital health interventions (DHIs) categorizes the different ways in which digital and mobile technologies are being used to support health system needs. Targeted primarily at public health audiences, this Classification framework aims to promote an accessible and bridging language for health program planners to articulate functionalities of digital health implementations. Also referred to as a taxonomy, this Classification scheme is anchored on the unit of a “digital health intervention,” which represents a discrete functionality of the digital technology to achieve health sector objectives.

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She knows best: Engaging girls in adolescent programming
Posted: Apr 20, 2018
Category: Health and rights

She knows best: Engaging girls in adolescent programming

With the support of the David & Lucile Packard Foundation, the International Rescue Committee piloted a new approach to increase access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care for adolescents in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo. The report “She knows best: Engaging girls in adolescent programming” highlights the strategy developed to address foundational facility and community-level barriers that prevent adolescents from accessing and receiving quality SRH services.

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The 90-90-90 compendium Volume 4
Posted: Apr 20, 2018
Category: Tuberculosis/ HIV

The 90-90-90 compendium Volume 4

The 90-90-90 Compendium is Health Systems Trust’s contribution to South Africa’s strategy for meeting the UNAIDS ‘Fast-track’ targets by the year 2020. We partner with a number of health districts in implementing the 90-90-90 Strategy, and during the course of our fieldwork, the need for a practical guide to assist health workers and other stakeholders in understanding and implementing the strategy was identified.

Two booklets make up Volume 4 of the Compendium, which was released in February 2018: The role of communities and individuals in combatting the epidemic and Healthy me, healthy us: A guide for community members about good health and staying healthy with chronic illness. These are designed around an illustrated dialogue that explains the need for regular screening for diseases and chronic illness, as well as the steps to be followed for treatment and care. Community health workers and caregivers, community-based and faith-based organisations, and other networked associations, can share this handy resource with their clients and constituencies, and we hope that its usage will empower community agents and members with valuable guidance while generating increased uptake of primary health care services.

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IT TAKES CHILDREN LIFTING THE VOICES OF YOUNG LEADERS
Posted: Mar 13, 2018
Category: Child Sexual Abuse prevention

IT TAKES CHILDREN LIFTING THE VOICES OF YOUNG LEADERS

This report was photographed and written by 21 children and young people, aged 13 to 18, who are part of the World Vision Young Leaders project, which aims to equip and empower them to engage in actions to end violence. I have had the privilege of working with these children and young people from countries throughout Asia, Africa, South America and Europe. I have watched them create a global network where they communicate, share their own experiences and the experiences of other children in their countries, and together try to find solutions to the problems that affect them, especially those related to violence. They write blogs, represent their peers at high-level debates, and speak in the name of all the children who do not have a voice.

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Our Bodies book
Posted: Mar 13, 2018
Category: Child Sexual Abuse prevention

Our Bodies book

One in three South African children will be sexually abused in some way by age 17.Jelly Beanz believes that parents and caregivers can help prevent the abuse of their children by having open and honest conversations about bodies, sex and body rules. These conversations should start as children enter formal schooling. The Our Bodies book has been developed to guide parents through this difficult, but very important process.

FAQ’s:

Is my child not too young to learn about sex?

  • It is a parent’s privilege to be the first person to speak to a child about bodies and sexuality. You will impart the facts of life, but also the values and morals that you want your child to have. If children do not learn about sex from a parent by the time they enter formal schooling, it is only a question of time before another child, a sibling or the internet will inform them.

Will my child not become overly interested in sex if I talk about it?

  • No. Young children are generally more interested in how babies develop than in how they are conceived.

Schools do sex education, can I leave it to the school to have the talk with my child?

  • Schools do sex education and it is important for educators to speak to young people about sexuality. If your child has questions or problems it would be better for your child to speak to you rather than at school.

Click here to get a copy of the book