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Posted in: February 2017
Adolescent job aid
Posted: Feb 28, 2017
Category: Women and girls development

Adolescent job aid

What is the Adolescent job aid?
It is a handy desk reference.
Who is the Adolescent job aid intended for?
It is intended for health workers who provide primary care services (including promotive, preventive and curative health services) to adolescents. These health workers include doctors, midwives, nurses and clinical officers. The Adolescent job aid takes into account the fact that in most settings health workers provide health services to children and adults in addition to adolescents.
What is the purpose of the Adolescent job aid?
Its purpose is to enable health workers to respond to adolescents more effectively and with greater sensitivity. To do this, it provides precise and step-wise guidance on how to deal with adolescents when they present with a problem or concern regarding their health and development.
What does the Adolescent job aid contain?
It contains guidance on commonly occurring adolescent-specific prob-lems or concerns that have not been addressed in existing World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines (e.g. delayed menarche). It also contains guidance on some problems and concerns that are not adolescent specific but occur commonly in adolescents (e.g. sexually transmitted infections) and highlights special considerations in dealing with these conditions in adolescents.
How does the Adolescent job aid relate to other WHO guidelines?
It is consistent with and complementary to other key WHO guidelines including:
• Integrated management of adolescent and adult illness
• Integrated management of pregnancy and childbirth
• Decision-making tool for family planning clients and providers

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Tuberculosis/HIV Checklist
Posted: Feb 28, 2017
Category: Tuberculosis/ HIV

Tuberculosis/HIV Checklist

In countries implementing lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART) for pregnant and breast-feeding women (commonly referred to as “Option B+”), prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) sites will effectively function as HIV care and treatment centers for women and, often, for their children and families as well. As national PMTCT programs are revising guidelines, training curricula, and recording and reporting tools for Option B+, this is a unique opportunity to incorporate TB/HIV activities into program planning efforts. TB/HIV services should also be integrated into the broader continuum of maternal, newborn, and child (MNCH) settings, including community and facility-based sites providing postpartum services, immunizations, and other child health interventions.
In order to reduce the impact of TB among mothers and children, it is essential that PMTCT and MNCH programs adopt the World Health Organization (WHO) recommenda-tions for TB/HIV, including implementing TB intensified case finding (e.g. screening of all PLHIV and systematic evaluation of contacts of people with potentially infectious TB), infection control measures, and isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) [6-8].

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siyam’kela – HIV/AIDS stigma indicators – A tool for measuring the progress of HIV/AIDS stigma mitigation
Posted: Feb 28, 2017
Category: Stigma and discrimination

siyam’kela – HIV/AIDS stigma indicators – A tool for measuring the progress of HIV/AIDS stigma mitigation

This document outlines proposed indicators of HIV/AIDS stigma, specifically focussing on internal and external stigma. Before the indicators are presented some key terms are defined. This is followed by an overview of the research approach which highlights the research process undertaken to develop these indicators.

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Fueling the Epidemic: HIV-Related Stigma and Discrimination
Posted: Feb 28, 2017
Category: Fact Sheets

Fueling the Epidemic: HIV-Related Stigma and Discrimination

Thirty years into the HIV epidemic, HIV-related stigma and discrimination continue to be pervasive in the lives of people living with HIV. HIV-related stigma and discrimination occur throughout the world – however, they manifest differently and in varying degrees in different locations. Stigma associated with HIV and the resulting discrimination can be as devastating as the illness itself. Furthermore, the spread of HIV can be directed attributed to HIV – related stigma and discrimination. Despite the widespread recognition of the pervasiveness of stigma and discrimination and their harmful impact on HIV responses, appropriate levels of funding for programs aimed at reducing stigma and discrimination are still lacking.

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Siyam’kela: addressing HIV/AIDS related stigma
Posted: Feb 28, 2017
Category: Stigma and discrimination

Siyam’kela: addressing HIV/AIDS related stigma

This monitoring and evaluation tool was developed to be used in different settings and is based on the stigma indicators as developed by Siyam’kela. The indicators can be used as markers to inform whether stigma is increasing or decreasing in any context.
The two main forms of stigma are the externalised or symbolic stigma that which is overt ostracism and discrimination towards PLHA there is internalised stigma, self stigmatisation — which is said to be protective strategies by those, living with HIV and AIDS.

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